Glacier National Park: Three Perfect Days

From Tacoma, WA we took I-90 through Coeur d’Alene, ID to St Regis where we transitioned onto a northbound route to Hot Springs, MT. From there we went directly to Glacier National Park. 

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Coeur d’Alene RV Resort in Post Falls, ID was a great stopping point. Level pads, wifi, and a pool.

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In Hot Springs, MT do not stay at Symes Hot Springs! We stayed there and it’s not worth putting yourself through. It’s old, not well kept, dusty, and creepy. The germophobe in me cried all night. The blankets were dirty, the pillows inside the cases had nasty stains on them, the carpet hadn’t been cleaned in years. For the same money stay around the corner at Alameda Hot Springs Resort and if you must visit Symes do so on a day pass. If you stop in during the summer at Symes say hi to Mabel the Great and try to imagine Symes as it was in its heyday and not in its current state.

 

Flathead Lake is gorgeous. We will stay there next time we go through.

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Kalispell has all the things: Cabelas, Popeyes, Krispy Kreme, Target, Costco, and Starbucks (but no mugs).

Sundance RV, right outside West Glacier,  is where we stayed for one night for hook ups so we could prepare to dry camp in Glacier.

Glacier NP has so much to offer. I promise you if you go you will want to return. The Going to the sun road over Logan Pass is a MUST DRIVE (or ride).

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Look into Road Scholar Tours if you want the Cadillac version of touring this park. If you are doing it yourself, visit the NPS webpage on guided tours in case you want to learn from an expert while in the park. That site has the best boat, bus, hike, raft, and horseback tours available.

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West Glacier Restaurant was decent, better than the food in the Park. Plus they serve elk.

Jammer Tour or Going to the Sun Road Shuttle? The jammer red bus tour is a bit pricey but you get to stop at each site along the way and take photos and hear about what you’re seeing. If you do that your first day you can make note of the trails and scenic views you want to go back and see on the shuttle.

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Apgar Campground was where we camped in Glacier. It was quiet and walking distance to Lake McDonald, Apgar Village, and the Visitor’s Center.

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Make sure you use the bear lockers if you are tent camping!

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Avalanche Lake trail is a nice, moderate trail that I would recommend. It is connected to Trail of the Cedars, which is also nice and wheelchair friendly.

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Lake McDonald is gorgeous and you have to go swimming or kayaing in it.

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Up the road is McDonald Creek, which has a nice, accessible waterfall (near Johns lake trail bridge).

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Bowman Lake is a drive short, very secluded, and breathtaking.

Stop at Home Ranch Bottom on the way to or from Bowman Lake for limoncello, Apple wine, huckleberry wine, and taco Tuesday. I hope these two are there and you get the full “cowboy who makes limoncello” speech.

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For more information on things to see and do in Glacier National Park, see these articles:

A Whole Day in Glacier for a Sightseer

“If you have one day to take in the highlights of Glacier National Park, drive Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR) in its entirety. GTSR is a 50-mile long, two-way road that cuts through the center of the park between the West Entrance and the St. Mary Entrance. Your journey can begin at either location. To return, either retrace your path back over GTSR, or take U.S. Hwy 2 along the south border of the park to create a loop. Along U.S. Hwy 2, you will find scenic views, some restaurants and lodging.” (click link for full article)

Take a Half-Day Hike in Glacier

“Glacier boasts 734 miles of trail. It is safe to say there is something for every ability level. Day hikes abound in every section of the park, from a short lakeside stroll to a hike up a mountain. Bring plenty of food and water on your hike, wear sturdy footwear, and remember the weather can change at any time. Be prepared with both rain gear and sunscreen. Below are some popular trails for a half-day (3-5 hour) excursion. These hikes may take longer depending on your hiking speed and ability. Mileages listed are ONE-WAY.” (click link for full article)